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Posts Tagged ‘Eastern townships’

Since last Saturday, the Circuit des Arts Memphremagog event has been taking place and my studio-gallery has been opened to all that show up at my door up until 5pm this afternoon. Today is the last day and as this exhibit is ending, I though I would share a few photos of my paintings set up in two rooms of my home.

 

Weather-wise, the week was eventful, with strong rain storms and hot sun, a mix of everything. Today for the last day, all is quiet, sunny and cool.

 

I always enjoy that event that puts viewers directly in front of my art without any distractions and helps them understand what is behind it, the motivation for creating it, the difficulties and joys encountered during the development of each painting.

 

For me, there is nothing like direct contact and conversation with the viewer. This exchange is enriching on both sides and more interesting than during a group exhibit or a symposium where the person is trying to see as much as they can in a very short time.

 

This was a wonderful 9 days and I feel I learned a lot about art lovers and their needs and expectations.

 

A big THANK YOU to everyone who visited me!

 

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Enviroart par Suzanne Bélair

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The Circuit des Arts Memphremagog is just around the corner and this year marks its 25th anniversary.This event gives visitors the opportunity to admire and purchase artworks from professional artists, see their creative space and admire beautiful vistas along the road. I truly enjoy this event and meeting people that show up at my studio door during the Circuit.

 

As usual, I will have two rooms full of paintings and many new works. Situated at 123 rue Du Lac des Sittelles in Austin, my Township studio will be open from 10 am until 5 pm starting July 21st to the 29th . There is also a collective exhibit at the Magog Visual Art Center, located at 61 Merry north in Magog where each artist is showing one piece of artwork representing his or her production.

For more information, go on the Circuit’s website: Just click here.

I am also participating in the 20th Edition of the Bromont en Art Symposium that takes place in the Old village of Bromont from August 24th to 26th from 10 am to 6pm. For more information please click here.

There is also an exhibit from July 7th to 15th at the St-Patrick cultural center in Bolton East where I will have one piece of art showing with other regional artists.

Everyone welcome!

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Here is the second rendition of the round barn of Mansonville. For the needs of the exhibition on round barns that will be held soon at Austin’s City Hall, I painted the subject in another format and from a different angle.

Patrimoine 3, Mansonville, Qc. ©2015 Suzanne Belair Oil on canvas, 22 X 28 in

Patrimoine 3, Mansonville, Qc.
©2015 Suzanne Belair
Oil on canvas, 22 X 28 in

The visit organized last year made me discover part of the history of the region and an architecture unbeknown to me until then.

To see the other version of this round barn and discover its history, click here .

To see the Austin round barn and its origin, click here .

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Références:

1. Blitz, Culture et patrimoine, 2010, Plan d’interprétation et de mise en valeur de la grange ronde de Mansonville, disponible au :
http://patrimoinepotton.org/biblioapp/Rapport_Blitz_grange_ronde_Mansonville.pdf

Bourque, Hélène, 1998. Granges rondes, rapport d’expertise: mise à jour des données d’inventaire, Qc. Ministère de la culture et des communications,.s.p.

http://www.patrimoine-culturel.gouv.qc.ca/rpcq/detail.do?methode=consulter&id=165435&type=bien#.VXWeXc9Viko

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Last summer, the City of Austin’s cultural committee in Eastern townships had organized a guided tour of the round barns of the region. Here is the one we visited in Mansonville which I painted, with a bit of history about the area’s round barns.

Patrimoine, Mansonville, Qc ©2015 Suzanne Belair Oil on canvas, 20 X 30 in

Patrimoine, Mansonville, Qc
©2015 Suzanne Belair
Oil on canvas, 20 X 30 in

The round barn of Mansonville, located in the Canton of Potton, was built in 1911 by Robert J. Jersey and was exploited by various other owners as an agricultural building until 1990.  It is a cattle barn made out of wood, which includes three levels. In 2009, it was declared “heritage building” for the architectural interest of its exterior envelope. It is different from the traditional cattle barns because of its circular plan.

“This circular architectural style, observed in the Eastern Townships, began with the Protestant sect of the Shakers, itself resulting from the Quakers” (1). The Shakers,  French Protestants, were exiled in England because of the persecutions suffered in France, their country of origin. At the beginning of the 18th century and still persecuted, they exiled themselves towards New England. It is during the 19th century that their style, characterized by the lack of decorative elements, is defined. At that time, the Shakers owned Community farms comprising several buildings, including the circular barn. “The legend says that this style was justified by the belief that the devil could hide in corners.” (1) Several examples of round barns can still be observed in New England.

Between 1885 and 1920, the idea is adopted in Quebec for certain barn-cattle sheds, but only a few tens of round barns are built on our territory. Several are in the Eastern Townships area, close to the American border,  including four in the area of Potton. The model is then considered more productive for the dairy farms, with less external walls, a central silo which supports the distribution of food and better lighting.

The distinguishing characteristics of the Mansonville round barn are its three dormer windows with pinion piercing the roof that testify to local alternatives. Nevertheless, it is an example representative of this type of agricultural building, by its circular plan, the rise on three levels being useful as cattle shed, hayloft and battery, as well as the ramp also called “garnaud”, which gives access to the last level and is covered with a straight double-pitch roof. The external facing in horizontal boards and the lantern laid out on the ridge of the circular broken roof are also typical of the model.

Following the tornado of 1913 and then with a major flood in 1927, the round barn of Mansonville is the only one which survived in this Canton and the only one to be built in the middle of a village. There now remains six round barns in the whole area, including one in Austin which was the subject of a previous post: click here .

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References:

  1. Blitz, Culture et patrimoine, 2010, Plan d’interprétation et de mise en valeur de la grange ronde de Mansonville, disponible au :

http://patrimoinepotton.org/biblioapp/Rapport_Blitz_grange_ronde_Mansonville.pdf

Bourque, Hélène, 1998. Granges rondes, rapport d’expertise: mise à jour des données d’inventaire, Qc. Ministère de la culture et des communications,.s.p.

http://www.patrimoine-culturel.gouv.qc.ca/rpcq/detail.do?methode=consulter&id=165435&type=bien#.VXWeXc9Viko

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The Municipality of Austin’s cultural committee in Eastern Townships organised a guided tour of 2 round barns in the area last summer. Here is the one from Austin that I painted a few weeks ago.

Patrimoine 2- Austin, Qc ©2015 Suzanne Belair Oil on canvas, 24 X 30 in

Patrimoine 2- Austin, Qc ©2015 Suzanne Belair Oil on canvas, 20 X 30 in

This barn is located on a private property which borders lake Memphremagog. I do not believe it is visible from the lake and it is not from the road either. An architectural treasure well hidden and protected by the government because this barn “was classified historical building in 1984, which requires the owners to preserve it in good condition and allows them, to this end, some financial or technical assistance from the ministry” (1). It is in 1907 that Damase Amédée Dufresne gave the contract to a local carpenter to build it with the intention of exploiting it as a dairy farm. The overall structure is characterized by the construction technique used at the time and the form of its buildings.

According to Eric Arthur, the Canadian architectural historian that published a book entitled “The Barn” in 1972, the round barn of Austin is “remarkable because it was conceived by empirical means without the contribution of an engineer and of his precise knowledge on the way in which softwood lumber of any given size reacts under compressive forces of tension in normal or unfavourable conditions. There is no silo nor central post… Interior space is completely free thanks to a superb roof of radiant rafters.” (1)

Several historical information on the arrival of the round barns in the region as well as other references will be available on my next post.

References:

  1. http://www.nationaltrustcanada.ca/sites/heritagecanada.org/files/magazines/Aut2003_Granges%20Rondes.pdf

http://grandquebec.com/villes-quebec/austin/

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